Code for a browser Response Cookies

Here is an example code for setting and getting response cookies using JavaScript:

Setting a response cookie:

// Set a cookie that expires in 7 days
document.cookie = "name=value; expires=" + new Date(Date.now() + 604800000).toUTCString() + "; path=/";

This code sets a cookie with the name "name" and value "value", with an expiration time of 7 days from the current time. The path attribute is set to "/" to ensure the cookie is available to all pages on the website.

Getting a response cookie:

function getCookie(name) {
  const cookieString = document.cookie;
  const cookieArray = cookieString.split(';');
  for (let i = 0; i < cookieArray.length; i++) {
    const cookie = cookieArray[i].trim();
    if (cookie.startsWith(name + '=')) {
      return cookie.substring(name.length + 1, cookie.length);
    }
  }
  return null;
}

// Example usage
const myCookie = getCookie('name');
if (myCookie) {
  console.log('Cookie value:', myCookie);
} else {
  console.log('Cookie not found');
}

This code defines a function getCookie that takes a cookie name as an argument and returns the value of the cookie, or null if the cookie is not found. The function splits the document.cookie string into an array of individual cookies, then loops through each cookie to find the one with the specified name. If found, the function returns the cookie value. Otherwise, it returns null.

Note that response cookies are set by the server in the HTTP response headers, and can be retrieved by the client as shown above. The specific method for setting response cookies may vary depending on the server-side technology being used.

Code for a browser cookie banner

Here is a basic example of code for a browser cookie banner that notifies users that your website uses cookies and asks for their consent:

HTML code: 

<div id="cookie-banner">
  <p>This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. By continuing to use this site, you consent to our use of cookies. For more information, please see our <a href="#">Cookie Policy</a>.</p>
  <button id="accept-cookies">I accept</button>
</div>

 

CSS code: 

#cookie-banner {
  position: fixed;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
  background-color: #f5f5f5;
  border-top: 1px solid #ccc;
  padding: 20px;
  text-align: center;
  font-size: 14px;
}

#accept-cookies {
  background-color: #4CAF50;
  border: none;
  color: white;
  padding: 10px 20px;
  text-align: center;
  text-decoration: none;
  display: inline-block;
  font-size: 14px;
  margin-top: 10px;
  cursor: pointer;
}

JavaScript code:

const cookieBanner = document.querySelector('#cookie-banner');
const acceptCookiesBtn = document.querySelector('#accept-cookies');

function hideCookieBanner() {
  cookieBanner.style.display = 'none';
  localStorage.setItem('cookieAccepted', true);
}

if (localStorage.getItem('cookieAccepted') === 'true') {
  cookieBanner.style.display = 'none';
} else {
  acceptCookiesBtn.addEventListener('click', hideCookieBanner);
}

This code creates a banner at the bottom of the page that informs the user about the use of cookies and provides a button to accept them. When the user clicks the button, the banner is hidden and a cookie is stored in the user's browser to remember their consent. If the user has already accepted cookies, the banner is not displayed.

Note that this is just a basic example, and you may need to customize the code to fit the specific needs of your website and comply with applicable privacy regulations.

Code for a browser E-commerce Cookies

Here's an example of how you can use e-commerce cookies to store and retrieve data related to user shopping carts and preferences:

<script>
  // Retrieve the shopping cart from the e-commerce cookie, or create a new one if it doesn't exist
  var cart = getShoppingCart() || { items: [], total: 0 };
  
  // Add an item to the shopping cart
  function addToCart(item) {
    cart.items.push(item);
    cart.total += item.price;
    // Update the e-commerce cookie with the new shopping cart data
    setShoppingCart(cart);
  }
  
  // Get the user's preferred currency from the e-commerce cookie, or use the default currency if it doesn't exist
  var currency = getPreferredCurrency() || "USD";
  
  // Update the user's preferred currency
  function setPreferredCurrency(newCurrency) {
    currency = newCurrency;
    // Update the e-commerce cookie with the new preferred currency
    setPreferredCurrency(currency);
  }
  
  function getShoppingCart() {
    // Get the value of the e-commerce cookie
    var cookieName = "shoppingCart";
    var cookies = document.cookie.split(';');
    for (var i = 0; i < cookies.length; i++) {
      var cookie = cookies[i].trim();
      if (cookie.indexOf(cookieName + '=') == 0) {
        return JSON.parse(decodeURIComponent(cookie.substring(cookieName.length + 1)));
      }
    }
    return null;
  }
  
  function setShoppingCart(cart) {
    // Set the e-commerce cookie with the updated shopping cart data
    document.cookie = "shoppingCart=" + encodeURIComponent(JSON.stringify(cart)) + "; path=/";
  }
  
  function getPreferredCurrency() {
    // Get the value of the preferred currency cookie
    var cookieName = "preferredCurrency";
    var cookies = document.cookie.split(';');
    for (var i = 0; i < cookies.length; i++) {
      var cookie = cookies[i].trim();
      if (cookie.indexOf(cookieName + '=') == 0) {
        return decodeURIComponent(cookie.substring(cookieName.length + 1));
      }
    }
    return null;
  }
  
  function setPreferredCurrency(currency) {
    // Set the preferred currency cookie
    document.cookie = "preferredCurrency=" + encodeURIComponent(currency) + "; path=/";
  }
</script>

In this example, we define a getShoppingCart() function that retrieves the value of an e-commerce cookie and returns it as a JavaScript object. If the cookie doesn't exist, we return null.

We also define a setShoppingCart() function that updates the e-commerce cookie with new shopping cart data. We use JSON.stringify() to convert the JavaScript object to a string before setting the cookie.

We define a similar pair of functions for the user's preferred currency, with getPreferredCurrency() and setPreferredCurrency() functions.

We use the addToCart() function to add items to the shopping cart. We update the cart object with the new item, and then call setShoppingCart() to update the e-commerce cookie with the new shopping cart data.

Note that in this example, we set the path attribute of the cookie to /, which makes the cookie available to all pages on the same domain. If you want to restrict the cookie to a specific directory or set of pages, you can adjust this attribute accordingly.

Code for a browser Security Cookies

Here's an example of how you can use a security cookie to store and retrieve data related to user authentication:

<script>
  // Get the value of the security cookie, or create a new one if it doesn't exist
  var securityToken = getSecurityToken() || generateSecurityToken();
  
  // Send the security token with each HTTP request
  var xhr = new XMLHttpRequest();
  xhr.open("GET", "https://example.com/data");
  xhr.setRequestHeader("X-Security-Token", securityToken);
  xhr.send();
  
  function generateSecurityToken() {
    // Generate a random security token using the crypto API
    var array = new Uint8Array(16);
    crypto.getRandomValues(array);
    var token = "";
    for (var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
      token += ("00" + array[i].toString(16)).slice(-2);
    }
    // Set a cookie with the security token
    document.cookie = "securityToken=" + encodeURIComponent(token) + "; secure; HttpOnly; SameSite=Strict";
    return token;
  }
  
  function getSecurityToken() {
    // Get the value of the security cookie
    var cookies = document.cookie.split(';');
    for (var i = 0; i < cookies.length; i++) {
      var cookie = cookies[i].trim();
      if (cookie.indexOf('securityToken=') == 0) {
        return decodeURIComponent(cookie.substring('securityToken='.length));
      }
    }
    return null;
  }
</script>

In this example, we define a getSecurityToken() function that retrieves the value of a security cookie and returns it as a string. If the cookie doesn't exist, we return null.

We also define a generateSecurityToken() function that generates a random security token using the crypto API. We then set a cookie with the security token, using the secure, HttpOnly, and SameSite attributes to enhance the security of the cookie. We then return the token.

We then use the XMLHttpRequest object to send an HTTP request to https://example.com/data. We set the X-Security-Token header to the value of the security token, which allows the server to verify that the user is authenticated.

Note that in this example, we use the crypto API to generate a secure random number. This API is only available in modern browsers, so you may need to provide a fallback implementation for older browsers.

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